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still insisting he is in charge. we're live in london to see if he'll survive a keyboard meeting today. an explosive leak of classified military documents on the war in afghanistan. this morning they're raising new questions about u.s. military strategy and whether pakistan, america's critical ally in the region, has been aiding the enemy. a live report is just ahead. fast moving storms spawning tornadoes and cutting paths of destruction from the midwest to the northeast. homes have been torn apart and trees knocked down. live in the extreme weather center with where the threat is this morning. and the "a.m. fix" blog is up and running. join the live conversation right now. just go to cnn.com/amfix. but first, day 98 of the gulf oil spill and it may be tony hayward's last. the company could announce that he is done during a keyboard meeting in london today. many residents of the gulf coast say his words were salt on an already gushing wound and he became the poster boy for bad press saying the spill was
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relatively tiny, the environmental impact would be small, that he wanted his own life back when 1 people died in the initial disaster. phil beck is live at bp headquarters in london in morning. do we know if we're going to hear anything about tony hayward's future today? >> reporter: well, it looks like tony hayward is in the ejector seat but no one has pressed the button just yet. bp has just this morning released a statement saying that it notes all the media speculation suggesting there is about to be a change of senior management at the company but says no official decision has been made just yet. it says there will be a board meeting later today and any decisions out of that will be announced as appropriate but here that board meeting is really being interpreted as a formality for signing off on tony hayward's departure. he looks set to walk away with a fair sum of money, too, a golden parachute. there is a lot of speculation
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about just how big that will be. one possible outcome -- he's been with the company 28 years. he could receive a single payment of as much or more of $1.5 million followed up at the age of 60 with an annual pension payment of $900,000. inevitably it is fair to assume that a golden parachute that's considered to be overly generous will be controversial for a chief executive whose company is in so much trouble. john? >> word is, too, phil, bob dudley, recently put in charge of the gulf clean-up, will likely replace hayward. he was once in line for the ceo job in 2007 before that was given to hayward. what else do we know about dudley? >> reporter: bob dudley is the one name that's continually being mentioned as the likely successor and really the only name. he's currently the managing director and he's taken on day-to-day responsibility for the clean-up operation in the gulf. he was born in new york, raised in mississippi.
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what this means quite significantly for bp is that he would be the company's first non-british chief executive and he would very much put on an american face and american accent to this company's efforts of moving forward and getting over this very dark time. >> we await the results of that board meeting today. phil black in london for us this morning, thanks so much. work is resuming in the gulf of mexico on those two critical relief wells. the weekend storm threat set things back about a week. clean-up crews have also returned to the water this morning. one problem -- they can't seem to find much oil to clean up. cnn's david mattingly flew over the spill site with the coast guard this weekend. here's what he found out. >> this oil is rapidly breaking down and there's very little oil located earlier off of grand isle that perhaps could be skimmed but right now we're not seeing many targets for our
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skimming fleet of 780 skimmers. >> reporter: you realize when you say that it is so hard for people to believe that this spill was so enormous and yet we're having trouble finding the oil to skim it? >> it's not for lack of trying. we have 50 aircraft saturating this very location where satellites indicate there could be oil sheen in the area. so we're going to look just like we would doing search and rescue to see where any possible target pocket of oil might be over this area. >> rob marciano is live in gulfport, mississippi this morning. rob, you talk about not being able to see the oil but you certainly in your special this weekend saw a lot of it. tell us about the efforts they're ramping up now to do this kill of this well, the static kill. what's happening right now with the completion of those relief wells? >> reporter: well, as of midnight, the drilling ship that's been working on the relief well should have latched
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on to the mlrp package down there at the bottom of the gulf. we'll get in touch with bp later this morning when they get into the office to get confirmation of that. they used 67 steel joints to make that line a mile through the ocean. once that happens they're going to pull the plug that they put in temporarily for the storm, then run in some conditioning fluid to make sure the integrity is okay and kind of flush things out, then they'll start running that liner again and eventually seal it with cement. that whole process, granted, takes five to seven days so as far as a timetable for when they would try to static kill, we're still looking at the beginning of next week. so as you mentioned, the entire timetable to get this thing all seth said and done has been delayed about a week. that still puts us into at least the middle of august. they want to try the static kill first, then go after an intersection with the relief and
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well go for the bottom kill. i'm told the static kill will speed the process of killing the well from the relief well at the bottom for good. they want to give that an effort. as far as oil that's been seen around the gulf of mexico, as david mattingly pointed out, it's been more difficult to find that oil. we've had that well capped now for offense nine days. skimmers have been working all along. that's certainly given folks a heads-up. bonnie the last 24 hours has really brought strong on-shore winds. there was oil just south of grand isle about 12 miles offshore, significant oil, that likely made its way closer to grand isle. so there's still some oil just offshore but they do have significant amounts of skimmers to go after the oil they do find. right now i guess the positive note is that if they're having trouble finding the oil that's certainly a good thing. there's lots of sheen out there. this area is going to be impacted for weeks and months to come when the residual oil and oil broken down into little particles and sheen. but what they do fine they'll
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continue to try to skim as we go on through time and try to get things up and running full force with the plugging of the well today and then tomorrow. >> thank you, rob, there in gulfport, mississippi. in the next hour of "american morning," we'll be joined by former shell oil president john hofmeister. he'll give us his take on what it might be like inside that big bp board meeting today. we'll hear from him at 7:40 a.m. eastern. also developing this morning, the white house blasting the whistle-blower website for publishing classified documents from the war in afghanistan. the website leaked what it says are more than 90,000 military and diplomatic reports about the war, raw data on deaths and casualties over the past six years. the white house calls the document "irresponsible" and that it puts american lives at risk. atika shubert is following developments. we'll have a live report from her just ahead here on cnn. local afghan officials say 1
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of 2 u.s. navy sailors missing in afghanistan has been killed. they say the body was found in the mountains of logar province where the two were reportedly abducted by taliban insurgents. they're said to be holding the other sailor. the u.s. military is offering a $20,000 reward for any information. we have a live report from pentagon correspondent barbara starr coming up. parts of iowa, new york and washington, d.c. are facing a major clean-up this morning after a string of severe storms and tornadoes. in iowa, a twister touched down on friday. nearly two dozen homes damaged there, trees and power lines ripped down. >> in new york, at least one tornado touched down 60 miles south of buffalo on saturday. investigators say the twister packed winds of 125 miles per hour. it toppled trees and damaged a number of apartments and homes. fortunately though only minor injuries were reported. and further south in
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washington, check out this scene. powerful storms brought down trees, including this one here which crashed into a two-story brick home. this happened as the nation's capital suffered through some really extreme heat. i remember yesterday about 3:00 in the afternoon i was in central park and it was like something out of the wizard of oz. all this wind came along, clouds going by at 40 or 50 miles an hour. it was pretty wild. >> you had to get everything done before that. get inside. jacqui jeras is tracking the weather forecast across the country. yesterday afternoon, oh, my goodness, what an end to the weekend. >> it was a crazy weekend. in addition to all those stories you guys mentioned, we had tropical storm bonnie which fizzled, thankfully. we had flooding in chicago. we had a dam break in iowa and we had all that record heat. today looks a little better but we still have our trouble areas. we'll focus a little farther to the south. our stationary front causing all the flooding rains is making its
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way down toward the tennessee valley. showers and storms across the southeast in addition to the brutal heat. high pressure finally builds in to the upper midwest and northeast bringing in breezy conditions and much cooler temperatures! hooray! temperatures will feel much closer to what they actually say on the thermometer, in the 80s and 90s. we also have fire danger across parts of the west. we'll talk more about that and tell what you to expect for your travel weather. there will be trouble spots there today as well. that's coming up the next half-hour. in the blogosphere, it is already being called the wedding of the decade and the closest thing america has to a royal wedding. this saturday chelsea clinton's getting married somewhere outside new york city and politics daily estimates the secretive ceremony could cost over $2 million. >> we're not sure but the venue will likely be a private french-inspired mansion in
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upstate new york called aster courts. the rental cost there is between $100,000 and $200,000. food and drink could be half to three-quarters of a million. $200,000 for tents. $40,000 on the band and another $25,000 for the photographer. now just as a point of chair son, chelsea's parents got married in front of family and friends in their living room in fayetteville, arkansas in 1975. don't know the cost but we can expect it would be a mere fraction of what they're spending on chelsea. >> times have changed, too. the u.s. military in a desperate search for two of their own. barbara starr is following developments. we'll hear from her next. stay with us. i want to fix up old houses. ♪ [ woman ] when i grow up, i want to take him on his first flight.
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basic.? preferred. okay. at meineke i have options, and 50% off brake pads and shoes. my money. my choice. my meineke. 14 minutes after the hour now. back with the most news in the morning. 1 of 2 u.s. sailors missing in afghanistan has reportedly died. local afghan officials say he was killed in a firefight with taliban insurgents in logar province. >> it is believed the other sailor is being held captive at this point. the u.s. military is offering an
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reward of $20 n$20,000 for information. barbara starr is live at the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning. terrible news, terrible uncertainty for at least two u.s. military families this morning about their loved ones. the u.s. military saying very little officially other than an air and ground search is under way in logar province south of the capital of kabul where the two sailors are believed to have disappeared on friday night. as you say, rewar money has been offered and posters have been put up with messages saying if -- to the afghans in the region if they have any information to please contact the afghan or u.s. officials. again, u.s. officials saying very little about this but the chief of naval operations, the top man in the navy, issued a very brief statement yesterday saying, "the thoughts and prayers of our entire navy go out to the missing sailors
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serving in afghanistan and their families. we have been closely following the situation from the outset. forces on the ground if afghanistan are doing everything they can to locate and safely return our missing shipmates." now of course, the bottom line concern is if they cannot find them quickly, there is great concern that the men could be taken across the border into pakistan outside the arms of any potential u.s. military rescue. the u.s. is aware of the reports that one sailor in fact has been killed and the other one remains in captivity but they are not confirming that at this hour. john? >> barbara starr for thus morning, thanks. workplace bullying. can you sue your boss for being a jerk? we'll tell you coming right up. 16 minutes after the hour.
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19 1/2 minutes after the hour now.
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"minding your business" this monday morning, walmart is trying to assure consumers that its new electronic i.d. tags will not be used to spy on shoppers. starting next month, the world's largest retailer will begin putting the so-called smart tags on certain items of clothing. the chips allow walmart to keep better track of its inventory but safety advocates say even when you leave the store the tags are not turned off and they remain trackable so people are worried that walmart may be keeping tabs on where you're going. here's something that's going to get everybody talking. is your boss a bully and should that behavior be considered illegal? new york may become the first state to outlaw workplace bullying. the state senate passed a bill that would allow workers to sue their bosses for medical expenses or lost wages for emotional stress. 16 other states are considering legislation. adam cohen joins us now, a lawyer and time.com contributor.
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thanks for being here with us. everyone loves to trash the boss every now and then. it just feels good. but why is this law important now? what's happening in the workplace that made legislators think this was important to put this out there? >> people have been working on this for a while. new york state was a big victory. but there is a feeling that particularly right now the workplace is becoming more of a jungle. some of it is the economy, some is the kind of unions. but there's a sense bosses are getting away with a lot more than they used to. >> isn't there already federal protections, labor laws in place for things like hostile work environment. why do they need an extra law to go into place? >> laws right now are very limbed. if there is racial harassment, religious or gender, if you fall into certain categories you're protected. but your boss standing in front of you and screaming at you for five minutes or writing evaluations that are untrue, other sorts of things aren't protected right now. >> these things are often very difficult to prove and there are a lot of people that are going
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to be worried about especially employers, fruitless lawsuits, people who just don't like their boss or being told what to do. they just think how can i get them back and they file suit. >> employers have a right to have a disciplined workforce. this is about conduct that goes beyond there. there are a lot of cases of bosses just screaming at a worker for five minutes, writing evaluations they know are not true or just bullying someone. there are bosses who in some cases actually have psychological problems. right to you there isn't much a worker can do about that. if you go to hr, they are not on the worker's side, they're on the boss' side. >> do you think this will change the way that business is done in the workplace, change the way corporations operate, what more can be done? a lot of people have these seminars and they put you through this different kind of training in the workplace to deal with colleagues and the bosses. will this change the way business is performed? >> i think it will. it sends a signal that there could be lawsuits down the road.
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you don't necessarily need a lawsuit. when employers begin to see that potentially a bullied employee can bring a lawsuit, yet in new york state if this law passes, punitive damages could be tens of millions, hundreds of millions of dollars, i think it will lead employers to actually check out their own backyard, see what's going on, see that hr gets on the case. because they don't want this to go to litigation. ideally this will lead to more self-policing that's going on right now. >> what about vagueness? what constitutes bullying as opposed to somebody getting angry with poor work performance, for example? >> that's a fair point but that's true in any kind of employment law when you talk about harassment. what exactly is sexual harassment, what is racial harassment. there are always line-drawing problems, definitional problems but it would fit neatly into those categories. juries are able to see when a workplace has gone past the line. >> do you think this is going to gum up the courts though? obviously anybody can throw a lawsuit out there and the courts
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are already having difficulty dealing with the number of cases they have already. >> true. but courts are actually pretty good at dismissing frivolous lawsuits. they don't get very far. i think this will be managed well by the court system and cases that are really extreme, really harassments that leads workers to in some cases have very serious disabilities because they are so abused at the workplace, ideally these cases will be resolved properly. >> thank you so much for joining us, adam koecohen to time.com, an attorney. so you know about these things. fully versed. thank you, adam. arizona's controversial immigration law. we'll go to one county in virginia where a similar law has been in the books now to take a look. look. 24 minutes after the hour. cars t for the autobahn.
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47 minutes after the hour. top stories just minutes away but first an "a.m. original," something you'll see only on "american morning." unless a judge steps in, arizona's controversial new immigration law will go into effect on thursday. it's grabbed headlines from day one kicking off a huge national debate about immigration. but prince william county in virginia has quietly had a similar law on the books for three years now. our sandra endois there to see how life has changed for the county's latino community. >> reporter: fear still rings in maria's voice. what has the law been like for you, living under this ordinance for three years now in this community? what have you been feeling and experiencing? >> afraid. i'm so afraid.
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everybody share the same feeling. we are afraid. >> reporter: it's been three years since prince william county in virginia passed a tough immigration law similar to the controversial arizona law. local police check a person's immigration status if that person is charged with an offen offense. maria's undocumented and asked us not to use her last name or show her face. she says she rarely leaves her home, scared of being racially profiled. >> we can be all the time, you know -- >> reporter: there are tears in your eyes because you don't feel free? >> yes, i don't feel free. >> reporter: at this supermar t supermarket, the owner says his business suffered because of the law. regular customers fled the county and moved away. >> people were running some rumors that immigration was here at the supermarket and don't go
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out. >> reporter: police statistics show overall last year, 6% of criminal arrests were found to be illegal immigrants and police can only stop to check a person's status if an arrest is made, not simply if a person is just stopped by cops. the county hired the university of virginia to find out the impact of the law. preliminary findings show the illegal immigrant community shrank but the law created discontent within communities of color. >> it did create very serious rifts in the community about how people viewed the county. it is still taking time for the police to repair those issues. >> reporter: prince william county police chief charlie dean says he's working to build that trust. >> we are very much committed to community policing, meaning that we understand -- i certainly understand and our officers understand that we have to maintain the trust of all of the people that we serve. >> reporter: castro believes the heightened fear of three years ago has lessened. do you think it was a good idea?
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>> well, i wouldn't consider it a good idea because of all the pain we went through, but we have a safer community. >> reporter: but for mamaria, t pain is still very real. >> people should come into my shoes and feel what latino people is feeling. >> reporter: sandra endo, cnn, prince william county, virginia. it is time for your top stories. bp boss tony hayward could be on his way out today. reports say the company will announce his exit at a blooard meeting in london. bp insisting for the moment at least he is still in charge. clean-up crews and relief workers are back in the waters of the gulf of mexico. the storm this weekend set back operations by about a week. bp is now looking at august 1st as a possible date to attempt a static kill on its damaged well. let the war games begin. the u.s. and south korea conducting joint military exercises in the korea peninsula. the drills involve 20 ships and some 200 aircraft.
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they'll continue through wednesda wednesday. the north threatens to retaliate with "sacred war." the white house calls it a threat to national security. a massive leak of secret military files on the u.s. war effort in afghanistan. >> the whistle-blower website wikileaks is behind the release of more than 90,000 documents raising new questions about military strategy, tactics an america's ally in the afghanistan war. cnn's atika shubert is following developments live in london. strong reaction from the military and the white house on all of this. >> reporter: exactly. it is actually taken a while for us to go through these documents but already it is sparking angry reaction from pakistan to afghanistan, all the way to the white house. this is the video that sealed wikileaks reputation as a clearinghouse for classified
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materials. created a stir over the killings in 2007 of two reuters journalists and others in an attack by u.s. forces in iraq. now wikileaks is publishing what it says is more than 90,000 u.s. military reports filed about the war in afghanistan from 2004 to 2009. raw data from the front line. a day-by-day unvarnished view of the war by u.s. soldiers themselves. wikileaks will not say how it received the documents and cnn has not been able to independently confirm their authenticity but if confirmed, it would be the biggest leak yet of classified documents to wikileaks. >> it is sort of the total squalor of the war. all of these people killed, the small events we haven't heard about which eclipse the big events, casualty events. it's the boy killed by a shell
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that missed a target. >> reporter: in a statement responding to wrchthe document release, the white house said, "the united states strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of americans and our partners at risk and threaten our national security." but the editor for wikileaks denies that the site has put troops in danger and says it did hold back some sensitive material. >> there certainly have been people that have lost elections as a result of the material the material, there's been legislator reform as a result of the material appearing on wikileaks. what has not happened is anyone being physically harmed as a result. >> reporter: he says his aim is to shine light on abuses in the field and give the general public the information it needs to have an informed opinion on the war. >> this material doesn't just
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reveal occasional abuses by the u.s. military. it has the u.s. military reporting all sorts of abuses by the taliban and ieds going on. it does describe the abuses by both sides in this war and it's how people can really understand what is actually going on and whether they choose to support it or not. >> the fact is, it is going to take weeks, even months, to go through this massive amount of information. these are thousands and thousands of raw data. so it's going to take a long time before we actually know the full impact. but already, a lot of the angry statements and blame is being passed around. >> you were talking to him about whether or not this could put the troops in danger. what does he say about -- how can he determine what will or will not put the troops in danger and if there is a board of people looking at this, a bunch of people or is it just
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one person making that decision? >> no. wikileaks is a group of journalists and analysts. but having said that, it is a rather mysterious group. no one knows exactly who is involved. obviously that man was the editor, there are other public faces but not everybody knows the whole group except for those involves. they claim they have had a 100% rate of verification, authenticity of their documents. they claim never to have been hoaxed or have any forgeries published. how can they tell that none of their material that's put out has caused physical harm? that's up for debate. the fact is they say that they have not endangered anybody. obviously people like the white house say putting this out there is endangering national security. it has to be said that wikileaks did actually hold back some records, 15,000 records, specifically because they named informants in villages in afghanistan and wikileaks felt that would endanger them and they will not publish those
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documents until those names have been redacted. >> atika shubert for us in london, thanks so much. we'll hear from you later on this morning as this continues to unfold. meantime, the voice of the tea party steps aside. mark williams, the former chairman, under fire for a blog rant that many are calling racist. is the party permanently damaged by it though? we'll ask that question coming up. 36 minutes after the hour. [ rattling ] [ gasps ] [ rattling ] [ laughing ] [ announcer ] close enough just isn't good enough. - if your car is in an accident, - [ laughing continues ] make sure it's repaired with the right replacement parts. travelers. take the scary out of life.
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one of the drives forces behind the tea party movement has resigned under fire. spoeshgs man and former chairman mark williams stepped down friday after a blog he wrote triggered cries of racism. it looks like minnesota congresswoman michelle bachmann are ready to step up and fill the void. joining us, cnn contributor john avlon. good morning. this whole thing with mark williams, he decided to remove himself from the tea party express after the tea party
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federation kicked him out of the whole game. is this what some people might call the self-correcting nature of something like the tea party? >> that is certainly what tea party enthusiasts say it is. they say it is evidence of a movement which is essentially leaderless which is self-correcting. when certain members go too far or people in quasi leadership positions are increasingly getting kicked out. right now the tea party movement is at a privity point, a crossroads, trying to move from pure protest and angry politics to political influence and policy influence but there are growing pains and i think the tea party caucus is an example of that. >> what kind of impact do you think it is going to have though on mid-term elections, november elections? they've already had some impact. >> huge. first, in the near material they've had a very strong record of tea party insurgent candidates beating the gop establishment in close primaries. mid-term is a low turn-out
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election which should be good for tea party enthusiasts. but candidates who have done well could be kryptonite to a general election. that's the transition that needs to be made. they could alienate more voters than they attract. that question is still unanswered. >> you mentioned the newly minted tea party caucus led by michelle bachmann, house of representatives, skepticism from both republicans and tea party about this whole thing. michelle bachmann says we're not here to lead, we're here to listen. listen to what she said. >> we are also not here to vouch for the tea party or to voich for any tea party organizations or to vouch or individual people or actions or billboards or signs or anything of the tea party. >> this caucus was self-appointed which has raised skepticism among tea party members because they like to pick their members in congress, not the other way around. >> that's right. michelle bachmann, putting as
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much distance as you possibly can while embracing the name with that caucus. what's interesting is the tea party movement, lot of it is recruiting is about a commitment to fiscal conserveism. a lot of principled conservative fiscal leaders of congress are nowhere to be found. members of congress are saying i don't want to be part of that because they are concerned about the appearance of extremism from key members of this caucus. the tea party movement is at a crossroads. do you follow michelle bachmann's leave or really have a policy impact. >> could it crumble or is it just getting started? some say it looks like it is falling apart a little bit. or is it just reworking itself? >> this is growing pains time, this is a crossroads. they'll try to turn this anger and protest movement into political gains in the fall. they've assembled a very impressive track record this
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year when it comes to close primaries. they're pubbly confronting some of their demons for the first time. in the past they tried to deny and now they're denouncing. it is a very pivotal moment. where it comes out in the fall will determine whether the tea party is a lasting movement or a piece that ends up alienating more voters. >> i want your take. what's the independent perspective on what happened with the shirley sherrod case? who's to blame? breitbart for putting this stuff on his website? the white house for accepting it at face value without looking further into it? are both culpable? >> sure. i think ultimately the white house overreacted clearly and made a mistake but you need to look at the whole cycle that we are all starting to feed into. independent voters have been angry about the hyperpartisanship affecting politics, this gotcha politics, gotcha journalism. here's an example of when it got all of control quickly. people reacted to a narrative
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that was already in place before they looked at it in context. this was taken unfor givablely out of context. this is the kind of personal or slander that can be caused. hopefully it becomes a teachable moment. something where we all say let's take a step back. there is right now a pollution-media confluence where ideological conflict is the bread and butter being stirred into this whole cycle. we look to look at this thing and say, stop, take a deep breath, get the facts right. it is not about short-term partisan gain, it is about long-term political thoughts and that's the idea we need to start advancing. >> thank you so much, john avlon. >> do you think people will actually take that to heart or might this just make it worse? >> i think we need to start demanding politics away from the far left and far right.
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jacqui jeras has the travel forecast after the break. in ten minutes, just when you thought you heard it all, never guess who took this car you're looking at for a joyride.
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beautiful view of the hudson
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river. the gw bridge and beyond this morning in new york city. right now it is a beautiful, nice and comfortable 69 degrees after the storms blew through and brought a little bit of cooler temperature in. but today the heat wave returns. 90 degrees later on under sunny skies in new york. there is a whole new landscape in eastern iowa this morning. a nine-mile long lake disappearing. 200 structures destroyed. 1,100 damaged after a dam reached its breaking point unleashing a wall of water on communities downstream. the governor calling it a catastrophic failure. officials say heavy rains pushed the lake two feet above its previous record set in 2004. amazingly though, even looking at those pictures, no injuries reported at this point. been a year of really wild weather. we had such a cold winter and such a hot summer. massive storm systems moving through. jacqui jeras is tracking the weather headlines for us in atlanta. i don't want to say this is one for the record books but maybe in some areas it is this year.
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>> oh, yeah, absolutely. there was record flooding, some places have seen record rainfall for the month already, including milwaukee, wisconsin where they had that terrible flooding. remember last weekend? they shut down mitchell field for a while. we finally have a little bit of a change in our weather pattern. our frontal system has made a little progress down to the south. many areas in the midwest and ohio valley will dry out a bit for today. the big focus for our weather headlines, here across the southeast. look at all the action already at this hour of the morning. showers and thundershowers making their way across the gulf coast, spotty showers across the tennessee river valley. we think things will fire up again this afternoon. i don't think we'll see a lot in terms of severe weather but we will see torrential downpours. some of the flash flooding is going to be a possibility. high pressure building into the north of that. that's starting to pull in a
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little bit of a cooler northwesterly wind. those of you across the northeast are finally going to see much better weather. check out these pictures, some video we got from one of our eye reporters in south dakota. he said it was just an incredible lightning like non-stop for about an hour. lot of it out there. we can expect to see that in the southeast for today. if you're trying to travel, those thunderstorms could cause some delays in atlanta, as well as memphis, st. louis and houston. low clouds in san francisco and maybe some of those delays because of the wind across the northeast. that will include you in new york city. let's talk some of these temperatures. we had record heat over the weekend. 101 in charlotte. columbia. 99 in atlantic take. 98 in washington dulles. 98 in the tricities of tennessee. charleston, down toward
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savannah, it could feel like 115 to 118! that's brutal heat and it will stay hot for the next couple of days in the southeast. you guys even though you're cooler today, you'll gradually start to warm up throughout the rest of the work week. >> 90 compared to 98 in new york is pretty good. >> it feels a lot better. >> and compared to 115. >> sara was hoping to come to the united states from new delhi hoping for cooler temperatures. spain's rider was the winner of the tour de france finishing nearly 40 minutes ahead of the 23rd placed american lance armstrong. yesterday armstrong's team was ordered to change jerseys. they tried to wear black to promote armstrong's cancer charity with the number 28 on it for the 28 million people who are suffering from cancer but were forced to change back into regulation jerseys before the
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final leg started. talk of big changes at bp with ceo tony hayward reportedly on the way out today. what a change at the top could mean for the gulf clean-up effort. compensation for the victims and the safety of its workers. also, talk of a second stimulus, the treasury secretary saying let the bush tax cuts expire. account fragile economy though handle that or could it cost you your job? after the break, you would think a bear would go for something bigger than a compact car. what happens when you leave your lunch in the back seat and the door open? ooh, that's what happens.
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rock bands deal with exhausting schedules, cramped tour buses, bad catering. but the kings of leon draw the linedroppings. they say they were forced to walk out in st. louis friday night because after pigeon infestation above the stage. the band's management says they really tried to hang in there but the aerial attack was just
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ridiculous. fans will be offered a full refund. maybe they'll do something to getpigeons, too. 7-year-old ben story will never leave a peanut butter sandwich in the back seat of his car ever again. there you can see the bear inside there. you can guess what happened. he went into the car, 2008 toyota corolla and started ripping it apart. seems a hungry bear got a whiff of that sandwich on friday morning. we'll let ben, becky and dad ralph pick up the story from there. >> there was a peanut butter sandwich in the back seat. >> i guess he smelled the sandwich. >> i think that what it was. >> he opened the back door and climbed right in. >> he hit the shifter knob. >> and the door closed behind pim. >> knocked it into neutral. >> he was trapped. >> rolled down the hill. >> just kind of sucks.
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>> that pretty much says it all. the bear was trapped in ben's car for two hours. sheriff's deputies say he was pretty agitated when they got to him but imagine, it was just a peanut butter sandwich. >> can you imagine -- as the car was rolling down the hill and the bear was really freaking out, he actually hit the horn. >> alerting the family that something was wrong. >> such a shame that nobody actually had video of that. one time when you really want it, we don't have it. top stories coming your way right after the break. stay with us. and to the interest for which we pay, compoundable with higher taxes and lower pay until the day we die. american taxpayers owe more than $500 hundred million in interest payments every day to cover our government's debt. much of that debt is owed to foreign governments. go to defeatthedebt.com. debt stinks!
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good monday morning. it is the 26th of july. i'm john roberts. >> kiran chetry's off today. i'm sara seidner. >> you were over from delhi, a
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little r&r, why not stop by? >> i said why not. >> you never say no to the boss. lot to talk about this morning. bp's ceo tony hayward, le make it through the day, this day, with his job intact? several reports that he could be out as soon as this afternoon. bp denies it. we're live in london with the latest. an air and ground search is under way right now south of kabul in afghanistan for two u.s. navy sailors. reports the taliban has killed one of those sailors. we're following the developing story from the pentagon just ahead. frightening sights with deadly results. powerful storms rip across the united states. tornadoes and dangerous floods destroy homes, uproot trees and knock out power to thousands of people. we are live in the extreme weather center just ahead. day 98 of the gulf oil spill. it may be tony hayward's last. the company could announce he's done. during a keyboard meeting in london today. many residents of the gulf coast say his words were salt on an
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already-gushing wound and he became the poster boy for bad press saying things like the spill was relatively tiny, that the environmental impact would be small, that he wanted his own life back when 11 people died in that initial disaster. our phil black is live at bp headquarters in london for us this morning. do we know if that meeting is under way yet? >> reporter: no, john. that board meeting for bp is set to take place later this evening london time so a few hours to go yet. at the moment, bp says that it is simply aware of all the speculation that exists surrounding the future of tony hayward and it has no further comment to make on it except to say that that board meeting is accept to take place. no decision has been made and any decisions that are made will be announced appropriately. that board meeting is really being interpreted here as merely a formality for signing off on tony hayward's departure. such is the intensity of the speculation that has taken place
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over the weekend. assuming that is true, assuming that his severance package is signed off on this evening london time, then we can expect tony hayward will walk away with a fairly decent golden parachute. there is a lot of speculation on just how much. he's been with the company 28 years. minimum payment would probably like like this -- a one-off payment of $1.5 million, then in addition to that, an annual pension payment of around $900,000. as i said, that's being interpreted as probably the minimum payment. that any golden parachute that's seen to be overly generous for a chief executive that is in such trouble, whose company is in such trouble, will inevitably be highly controversial. >> when you look at those figures, it is obviously a lot of money, $1.5 million in a one-time payment, $900,000 a
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year in pension compensation. he also apparently has maybe more than $300 million in stocks. but comparatively speaking, to things we've seen in the past this terms of golden parachutes, it is rather -- it's not what other people have gotten. let's put it that way. >> reporter: yeah, it is potentially low on those bare basic minimum figures. but there are all sorts of other things that could potentially being factored into that, like bonuses. that is where you could see those numbers blossom quite rapidly and very significantly as well. just want to add, the man that's set to replace him -- there is only one name being mentioned here -- ha is bob dudley, currently he's the managing director of dp. bp. he's been with bp for 31 years, born in new york, raised in mississippi, an american who would be this company's first non-british chief executive. >> we'll look forward to the results of that board meeting
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later on today. phil black for us this morning in london, thanks so much. meanwhile, efforts are resuming this morning to kill bp's ruptured well once and for all. operations set back by about a week because of this weekend's tropical storm but now crews are reconnecting equipment to resume drilling on those relief wells. rob marciano is live in gulfport, mississippi this morning for us. rob, we talk about this week. what is the new timetable for the static kill procedure? >> reporter: well, basically the earliest would be next monday. they are saying august 1st week would be the earliest they could try that static kill procedure. they've got the drilling platform that's been drilling the relief well. trying to get confirm maation t latched in back on site. they'll latch on the mlrp, run conditioning fluid down through
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the well bore, then eventually run the rest of the liner and cement that. that process is basically a five to seven-day process. until that is complete, they can't start the static kill process. that would put us at about a week from now. they tell me that -- i asked, why the static kill, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, let's wait until the leaf well is drilled. but they are emphatic the static kill operation will make the bottom kill from that relief well much, much quicker an much, much easier. that's where we are right now. as far as oil that was affected by the storm, it is getting more difficult to see significant oil because that cap's been on there for ten days now. but there were a couple of spots that did see an infiltration of oil because of bonnie. it wasn't a strong storm but we can pretty good strong onshore winds for a good 24 hours and there was significant oil offshore of grand isle that was getting closer an closer. but here in the mississippi sound, no reports of seeing oil here. that's certainly good news.
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but onshore wind today may very well change that. skimmers are still on stand-by, over 700 of them. good news is that the significant skimable oil is getting a little bit more difficult to find. we certainly hope that's the trend as we try to kill this thing in the weeks to come. >> rob, just because we can't see the oil obviously it is still there, a lot of it. what about a timetable for the clean-up? we saw you in there, it is gooey, sticky, very difficult to deal with. is there any idea how long it might take to deal with this? >> you know, timetable for that is indefinite. i did ask the folks in charge of the lean-up are you going to start to ramp down, say, listen, now we only need half the people that we've been hiring for vessels of opportunity? they wouldn't put a number on it because there is 15 to 20 regions in which all these vessels are opportunities are based from. those decisions to put them to work are on a day-by-day basis. safe to say the hiring of those vessels and the people here who
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have been put to work by bp will begin to slow down certainly in the days and weeks to come and that's of course a bad thing as far as the economy goes but a good thing as far as getting some progress in this clean-up effort but it will be ongoing for weeks, months, and in some cases, years. >> thanks, rob in gulfport, mississippi. coming up at 7:40 eastern, we'll be joined by former shell oil president john hofmeister for his take on what it might be like inside that big bp board meeting today. a massive clean-up effort is under way in washington, d.c. this morning after powerful thunderstorms swept through on sunday afternoon. wind gusts topped 60 miles per hour bringing down trees, including this with one which crashed into a house. no one was injured inside the home but one person was killed when a tree fell on a car. rough weather in the midwest, today too. check out this video of a tornado touching down in central iowa. it damaged two dozen homes and
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businesses friday night, though there were no reports of major injuries. also in iowa though, it was too much rain that caused this dam near cedar rapids to completely fail. the wall of water snapped trees and damaged or destroyed at least 130 homes and businesses. iowa's governor has issued disaster proclamations for two counties. in chicago and its suburbs, the streets are lined with waterlogged furniture after a storm dumped more than five inches of rain. at least ten towns are declared disaster areas there. >> goodness! eight minutes after the hour. let's get a quick check of the morning's weather headlines with jacqui jeras if the extreme weather center for us this morning. >> good morning, guys. people in the midwest are crying "uncle." it's just been unrelenting with storms and flooding and heat as well. the good news, a nice big break for you folks and it is going to stay that way i think rain-free probably through, say wednesday. just a sliver of a severe
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weather threat and that's way up there towards the u.s.-canadian border, across parts of north dakota and parts of western minnesota. the southeastern parts of the country, we have an area of low pressure that's moving across texas. that's the remnants of what was bonnie. that's going to help trigger some showers and thunderstorms especially with the heating of the day today. that cold front that caused all the severe weather in the mid-atlantic an ohio valley over the weekend, that's going to trigger thunderstorms in the southeast, maybe into the carolinas as well. on the north side of the system, high pressure is finally moved in. you got that price that you got to pay when you want a cooldown this time of year. it will feel a lot better. boston 86. 90 in new york. 91 in washington, d.c. that's after a plethora of record highs yesterday. we've also had many, many record high low temperatures, believe it or not. things looking much better across the u.s. today. we'll focus on that southeast. a lot of airport delays expected. atlanta will see some
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thunderstorms. that's always a nightmare. we'll talk more about that next half-hour. back to you. >> jacqui jeras this morning, thanks. still ahead on "american morning," captured in afghanistan. the taliban has killed one american sailor, another is still missing there this morning. barbara starr from the pentagon with the latest on the situation. nine minutes after the hour.
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this morning, u.s. troops in afghanistan desperately searching for two of their own who disappeared in a taliban stronghold in logar province.
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the u.s. military's offering a $20,000 reward for any information. just what happened to the two service members is still a mystery. barbara starr joins us live from the pentagon. barbara, at this point what do we know? >> reporter: very little officially, john. and why were these two u.s. navy sailors in a single vehicle traveling south of kabul, the capital, into logar province, a known taliban stronghold. why -- if they had some business down there, why was there no military convoy, why were they by themselves? this is one of the unanswered questions at this hour. even as that air and ground search goes on. u.s. troops franticly looking for these two sailors. now provincial afghan officials have said that one of the sailors was killed in a firefight, the other one captured. the u.s. not confirming that. they are saying, however, they are offering money, reward money, for any information. they have also put out a number
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of posters in the region saying, if you have any information about either of these navy sailors to contact u.s. or afghan officials. the hunt goes on in the meantime. the head of the u.s. navy, the chief of naval operations, issued this public statement -- "the thoughts and prayers of our entire navy go out to the missing sailors serving in afghanistan and their families. we've been closely following the situation from the outset. forces on the ground in afghanistan are doing everything they can to locate and safely return our missing shipmates." john, the underlying concern here is they want to find them before they are possibly moved across the border into pakistan. that of course would be out of the reach of any u.s. military rescue. >> barbara, any idea on when we'll learn the names of these two sa two sailers? >> they made decide to withhold
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publication for security reasons while the search goes on. the families have been notified but all information is really very closely held while this search goes on. they hope to get them back. >> barbara starr for us from the pentagon this morning, thanks. also new this morning, the u.s. and south korea flexing some military muscle designed to send a message to the north. the two countries are conducting joint military exercises off the korean peninsula involving 20 ships and some 200 aircraft. the drills are in response to north korea's sinking of a south korean warship in march. pyongyang is threatening to retaliate with "sacred war." two democrats on the senate foreign relations committee will hold a press conference at 10:30 this morning in times square. new jersey senator robert menendez and new york senator kirsten gillibrand will talk about this week's hearing on the release of the pan am bomber. the big question, did a bp oil deal between the uk and libya play any role in the release of the convicted terrorist?
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the two senators would like to know that. wildfires burning through the night in northeastern california. the fires broke out over the weekend. officials say the flames have already scorched 1,700 acres and destroyed three buildings. big debate over whether or not the bush tax cuts for the wealthy should expire. jeanne sahadi from cnnmoney.com joins us in the next couple of minutes to talk about whether or not there may be a little less in your paycheck every week starting at the end of the year. 16 minutes after the hour. of course, winning's not bad either. subaru. the only manufacturer with 2010 iihs top safety picks for all models. isn't it nice when honest virtues win?
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19 minutes after the hour. bp announced a second quarter earnings tomorrow while its shares have been cut in half since april. analysts expect earnings to be up 48% from the same period last year. reason? oil has spiked 50% higher since last summer and gasoline is up 34%. republican steve forbes is calling president obama anti-business. he told our candy crowley on cnn's "state of the union" that many businesses aren't hiring because they're concerned about the cost of health care, financing reform, and, of course, taxes. >> until the president deals
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credibly with that uncertainly it is going to be a very subpar economy. there are very serious headwinds in the face of this economy. >> at the same time the white house is out in full force defending the administration's push to let the bush tax cuts for wealthy americans expire this year. cuts critics argue would hinder economic growth. joining us with some perspective on what this could mean for the economy is jeanne saha sahadi, senior writer with cnnmoney.com. let's first look at some of these numbers here and what we're talking about. so the obama administration wants to let tax breaks expire for the highest earners, families earning somewhere around $250,000 a year and individuals making at least $200,000 a year. if congress allows the tax breaks to expire, that would mean that the top tax rate goes up to 39.6%. you see it there in 2011, from 33% up to 36%.
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some say it is only the top 2% or 3% of the population. on the other hand you talk about paying down the deficit. how significant are these? >> the upper 2% or 3% of americans are a significant group but relative to the other 97%, we cannot balance the budget on the back of 2% or 3% of taxpayers. what treasury secretary timothy geithner says a and people who support this expiration say we're putting into place a deficit reduction mechanism and there is a lot of push to start to do that. we can't do it all at once. but people shouldn't think, that's fine, if people make more than $250,000, good, we're done. not going to happen. >> let's listen to what timothy geithner said. >> we think think it is responsible to let the tax cuts expire that just go to 2% to 3% of americans, the highest earning americans. we think that's the responsible thing to do because we need to
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make sure we can show the world that we're willing as a country to start to make progress bringing down our long-term deficits. >> raising taxes to pay down the deficit or cut the deficit and begin to rein in the exploding debt is an idea that's gaining traction. alan greenspan says, don't just raise taxes on wealthy americans, raise taxes on everybody. but what about cutting spending? >> experts say you have to do both. the head of the president's fiscal commission says he finds it interesting how the british did it. in their debt reduction plan they leaned more heavily on spending, 75% on spending cuts and 25% in tax increases. so we're not at all there in terms of making that decision but the tax cuts -- the reason alan greenspan said that was we can't a afford the $3 trillion to extend them for everybody or the $2.2 trillion to extend them for most people. if we do expend bush tax cuts
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for upper income families, under pay-go rules they'll have to find the $700 billion somewhere else to pay for the cost to do that. it is a hard decision for lawmakers. even if they want to do it, they'll have to pony up somewhere else. that's not going to lead to a popular decision, however they decide. >> of course, we're talking not just about people who are considered -- people considered wentthy. talking about small businesses in this tax bracket and a lot of people will say that small businesses are really important to the economy, this can is going to hurt them, possibly lay people off or worry about their bottom lines. >> small businesses pay those top two income tax rates so if you raise them you're hurting the guy who owns the small business. people who say, not so much, it's really not going to have that much of an effect because only 3% of small businesses file at the top two rates and while they account for about 50% of all net small business income,
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some say that a big percentage, or at least a significant percentage of that 50% pot is from businesses that you wouldn't ordinarily associate with job creating small businesses, things like investment partnerships or law firms. so that's kind after dog fight that people are going to be having. >> let's look at where the economy's going. ben bernanke on one hand saying that this country's fraught with economic uncertainty. he's not sure how things are going to turn out. tim geithner says doesn't think there will be a double-dip recession, the economy will continue to recover over the next year or two. what are you hearing? >> i hear from everybody we still have economic growth but it is slow and will probably remain slow going forward. the jury is out on whether there is a double-dip recession. but one economist told me he thinks there is a better chance we won't have a double-dip recession but he also thinks we ought to extend the tax cuts for the middle class and only gradually phase them out for upper income, maybe do it over a couple of years because he
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thinks the economy's too fragile right now. i think ben bernanke and tim geithner are talking about the economy from different perspectives. ben bernanke has to signal to the markets about rates and geithner has to talk more broadly about the economy. >> talk about a rock and a hard place though. >> that's the way it is going to be though for the next few decades. coming up, if you want the latest financial news and analyst, go to cnnmoney.com. in the blogosphere it is being called the wedding of the decade and the closest thing america has to a royal wedding. this weekend chelsea clinton's getting married. we think we know where, somewhere outside of new york city. the secretive ceremony could cost -- here is a cha-ching if we ever heard one -- $2 million! >> venue likely to be a private french-inspired mansion in upstate new york called aster
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courts. here's how some of the costs break down. $100,000 to $200,000 food and drinks could be about $500,000 to $750,000. what are they feedi ining those folks? >> they'll be drinking good champagne. $200,000 on tents. chelsea's parents got married in front of family and friends in their living room in fayetteville, arkansas in 1975. >> how things change after you've been president. huh? still ahead, tens of thousands of military and diplomatic documents about the war in afghanistan leaked to and now posted on a popular whistle-blower website. are u.s. troops and our security here at home now at risk because of it? a live report just ahead. 26 1/2 minutes after the hour.
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your top stories this morning, bp boss tony hayward could be on his way out today. reports say the company will announce his exit at a board meeting in london. but bp for the moment insisting that hayward is still in charge. severe storms pounding parts of the northeast and midwest over the weekend and in western new york, one twisters ripped roofs off homes and ripped down trees and power lines. to the west in iowa, another
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tornado damaged homes but fortunately, no one was seriously injured. a massive military search continues in afghanistan this morning for two u.s. sailors who disappeared in a taliban stronghold. a $20,000 reward is being offered for any information. there is a report that one of the sailors was killed by insurgents if a firefight and the other taken captive but u.s. forces are not confirming either one of those. this morning, the white house is condemning the release of a treasure trove of classified documents on the war in afghanistan. tens of thousands of files were made public by the whistle-blower website wikileaks and paint a grim picture of the u.s. war effort in afghanistan. >> the white house this morning is saying it is a threat to national security to have all those documents out there. cnn's atika shubert is following developments live from london this morning. one of the people from wikileaks is currently holding a press conference and you're monitoring that. what are you hearing so far? >> reporter: that's right.
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i actually just came out of the press conference. it is being gibb by the editor of wikileaks. a very illusive figure. he pops up around the world, doesn't have a permanent address. this is a very, very rare event. basically he's going over the material, explaining what's in these 90,000 u.s. military records that wikileaks has put out and he's having to answer a lot of questions about that white house statement, whether or not wikileaks is endangering troops and others by publishing this material online, this raw data. he says that wikileaks has a harm minimization policy, that its ultimate goal is reform and its method is transparency is what he said. but it is not ad hoc release. that they have actually withheld some of those documents in order to prevent names of informers, for example, from being out there in the public. that might endanger them, he said. but otherwise, all of the material that has been released so far he says is not a national
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security threat because it is more than seven months old, and so it is not operationally current at the moment, he says, so it won't be a threat to any of the troops on the ground at the moment. john? this is the video that sealed wikileaks' reputation as a clearinghouse for classified materials. it created a stir over the killings in 2007 of two reuters journalists and others in an attack by u.s. forces in iraq. now wikileaks is publishing what it says is more than 90,000 u.s. military reports filed about the war in afghanistan from 2004 to 2009, raw data from the front line, a day-by-day unvarnished view of the war by u.s. soldiers themselves. wikileaks will not say how it received the documents and cnn has not been able to independently confirm their authenticity, but if confirmed, it would be the biggest leak yet
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of classified documents to wikileaks. >> is the sort of total squalor of the war. so all these people killed and the small events that we haven't heard about which numerically eclipse the bigger, casualty events. it is the boy killed by a shell that missed a target. >> reporter: in a statement responding to wikileaks' afghan document release, the white house said, "the united states strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of americans and our partners at rick and threaten our national security." but julian assage, the editor for wikileaks, says they did hold back some sensitive material and denies they're putting troops in danger. >> there have certainly been people who have lost elections as a result of material
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appearing on wikileaks. there's been legislator reform as a result of material appearing on wikileaks. what has not happened is anyone being physically harmed as a result. >> reporter: he says his aim is to shine some light on abuses in the field and give the general pub applicatilic the informatio to have an informed opinion on the war. >> this material doesn't just reveal occasional abuses by the u.s. military. it does describe the abuses by both sides in this war and it's how people can really understand what is actually going on. whether they choose to support it or not. >> atika, talk a little bit about sourcing. did he talk in the press conference about how wikileaks sourced this and any idea of where this came from and how are
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we sourcing it? are we going through and trying to verify some of this information? >> reporter: well, we are trying to go through some of this information and verify the accuracy of it ourselves, but there's an incredible amount of information here and it's just impossible to process in a short amount of time. in the press office, one of the british reporters sags the ministry of defense put out a statement saying it cannot independently confirm the validity of these records themselves because there's simply too much. in terms of the sourcing, assange stands by the wikileaks policy that they will not reveal the source of any of their documents and materials online. a lot of it they say is published anonymously on their secured website. that of course make it very difficult to verify exactly how wikileaks can authenticate this, but wikileaks says it has its own panel of journalists and analysts that have cross-checked this with military analysts and
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other nato, military member analysts. they say they believe this is 100% legitimate. they also add that they have a track record that shows nothing they've put on their website, they say so far, has been proven to be a hoax or forgery. >> atika shubert there for us, thank you this morning. still ahead on the most news in the morning, he said he wanted his life back, and bp may be giving it to him. will bp's ceo tony hayward make it through the rest of this day with his job? and who might take over if he's let go? former shell oil president john hofmeister is in this morning to talk about that. he's next. 36 minutes after the hour. g to . i want to run a marathon. [ female announcer ] at aarp we believe you're never done growing. i want to take him on his first flight. [ female announcer ] discover the best of what's next at aarp.org. [ female announcer ] discover the best of what's next at this moment, your father is alive...
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your son is safe... your wife is recovering... and your baby is coming home... is this really the moment to cut $4 billion from our hospitals?
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39 minutes after the hour. bp executive is reportedly on his way out today. the announcement could come at any moment from bp's board. bp's chief executive tony hayward expected to be replaced by american robert dudley as the company's top man. so far bp says hayward "has the full support of the board of directors." here to break down what's really going on behind the scenes at bp, john hofmeister, former
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president of shell oil. do you expect tony hayward will survive the rest of the day with his job? >> we'll see as the day progresses what the board decides. the papers are certainly covering it as though it is a done deal. the board has to worry about not only its own reputation as a board in terms of the wider business and investor community and so forth, they also have to think about the future. that is really the purpose of the board, is to govern the company under all circumstances but bp has -- is coming from a pretty difficult past here. to try to put the image out there of a board that's in charge of the destiny of a company is i think what this is all about. >> what do you think he'll come away with in terms of a golden parachute if he's ousted? we're hearing certain figures, maybe a one-time payment of $1.5 million, an annual pension of $900,000 at the age of 60. i know he has a tremendous amount of money in stock as well. what do you think given the
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circumstances bp can give him to go out the door? >> well, those packages are really carefully scrutinized in the uk. i worked there for about eight years as part of shell's organization, and the british people, the british press, they really carefully scrutinize. i think boards in the uk, as well as the rest of europe, are pretty straightforward on these separation packages. these are not as generous as what some people might see in the u.s. the numbers are large, but remember, tony's running one of the major companies in the whole world. and so there is a recognition of his contributions of many, many decades and i think because of the balance with which boards take these things, the numbers i've seen and read about don't surprise me at all. they're kind of in the ballpark of what's happened in other british companies. >> when you look at a guy who's been there for 28 years, he is running $150 billion company, at least that's what it was worth
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before the oil spill took the stock value down. if this was in the united states, he probably would be walking away with tens upon tens of millions of dollars. >> that's true. and that's where i think the british governance is a much tighter, tougher governance than what we've seen in the united states. it is a different pay market all together and within different pay markets, of course, there are certain principles, certain standards, certain rules that are followed. while it may get a few headlines, i think it is in the category of a sort of one-day story. >> right. now of course, he had some famous gaffes that left him appearing i guess by some people's measure less than sensitive about what was going on in the gulf. let's replay if we could this morning some of those greatest hits of tony hayward. >> this wasn't our accident. this was a drilling rig operated by another company. it was their people, their systems, their processes. we are responsible not for the accident.
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>> i think the environmental impact of this disaster is likely to be very, very modest. >> there's no one who wants this thing over more than i did. i'd like my life back. >> when this is looked at sort of in retrospect in the history of corporate governance, how will those statements be seen? >> i think they will be seen in at least two dimensions. one is those words never should have been uttered. i think whoever was his public relations coach really didn't do their job because those are utterances which showed insensitivity, they showed a level of misunderstanding of the situation that people really will not forget. at a second level, some of what he said is not that untypical of what would be commonly expressed in a very different culture, which the uk is, particularly "i want my life back." i heard that so many times living in the uk that when somebody had gone through a particularly stressful period, it's a bit like street talk, "i want my life back."
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of course it was inappropriate in the u.s. because it didn't go down at all well. >> when you consider that 11 people were killed in the deep water who are done and look at the effect across the gulf in terms of economics and livelihoods destroyed, to say something like that was taken to be incredibly insensitive. if he hadn't made those gaffes, do you think, john, we'd be talking about his ouster today? >> i think that's for the board to decide, john. and here's the issue. they've had a really, really rough time. recovering from this mortal incident is really something that has to turn the company in a new direction. much like other huge corporate tragedies, this is something that perhaps you need a new leader with a new set of criteria and while tony did many things well, i think it's time to move on. >> so this is something that might have destroyed a ceo regardless of what he said about it, i take it is what you're saying. what about bob dudley? the first american to ever head
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bp. how will he be different? >> i think bob has tremendous credibility, first of all. i think in the american scene he knows and understands america, which is very important when 40% of your asset base is in this particular country and in particular because you've set a strategic future predicated on developing the u.s. i think in that regard it is great to have somebody who understands the territory and the dynamic and the mindset of what's here. in addition, bob has significant global experience. he worked in russia which was very difficult. in fact i think he lost his visa as part of the politics of dealing with what he had to deal with. but this is a very accomplished executive and he comes from an amoco background, i believe. i think he will offer the company great leader . >> we'll see what happens potentially later on today. john hofmeister, always good to catch up with you. thank you this morning. still ahead, is your name on the list? two state employees under fire
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in utah for compiling a list of supposedly illegal immigrants in the state. is utah looking to become the next arizona when it comes to immigration law? and, jacqui jeras will have this morning's travel forecast right after the break. it's 45 minutes after the hour.
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good morning once again. 48 minutes after the hour. let's get a quick check of this
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morning's weather headlines. jacqui jeras is in the extreme weather center for us. it has been a wild, hot, disturbing time for a lot of folks. >> i know. it's like raise your hand if you had nice weather this weekend. i don't think anybody raised their hand. >> it was nice for a while. >> yeah, maybe for a minute or two but if you didn't have heat, you had storms, if you didn't have storms you had fire danger out west. there was a little of everything really out there over the weekend. check out these pictures out of washington, d.c. severe thunderstorms rumbled through there yesterday causing quite a bit of wind damage. knocking trees down on houses and causing some power outages. this is really the price you pay when you're talking about record heat in d.c. in the triple digits over the weekend and now we've got that heat relief which has moved in for today and will continue through at least midweek before you start to warm up a bit. that cold front is finally on the move though because it's been rather stagnant across the midwest. now it is kind of moving down toward the tennessee river valley and it will continue to focus showers and thunderstorms
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here in the southeast today with hot sultry conditions on the south side. on the north side we're dealing with cooler conditions and a little bit on the breezy side today. we have been seeing some pop-up thunderstorms already this morning. nothing terribly severe but it is just going to be more of a nuisance than you down for 15 minutes or so. hey, we do expect to see travel delays because of the wind to the northeast, so new york city is looking at an hour. atlanta and memphis expecting delays because of the thunderstorms. then the low clouds, which have been so persistent in the san francisco area, the heat continues. we had a number of record highs yesterday. the heat advisories are focused on the south. charleston, south carolina, feeling like 115 at times. still sticking around, just not for everyone. thank you, jackie. >> this morning's top stories are just minutes away now, including rain forests of the sea. we'll take you on an amazing ride to the bottom of the gulf of mexico to see how the oil
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spill is affecting a whole different world of wildlife. also, amazing video here caught on tape. a fighter jet plummeting to the ground during a practice run. luckily, the pilot bailing just a split second before that fireball there. and a struggle of hearts and wandering minds. the toll attention deficit disorder can make on your marriage and how to overcome those charges. that's coming your way at the up to of the hour. ♪ 'cause i'm about to drop some knowledge right on top of you ♪ ♪ you check a lot of things already why not add one more ♪ ♪ that can help your situation for sure ♪ ♪ check your credit score ♪ free-credit-score-dot-com free-credit-score ♪ ♪ you won't regret it at all vo: offer applies with enrollment in triple advantage. my sunglasses. ♪
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here's to the owners showing us the way. [trumpet playing "reveille" fades to silence] 53 minutes past the hour. arizona's controversial immigration law set to take effect on thursday, but just over the state's northern border one utah lawmaker is pushing ahead with a similar bill for his state. two utah state employees were just fired for a now i fa mouse immigration list. it had names and information of 1300 utah red dengts all accused of being there illegally. the debate is starting to divide the state, and that's why ted rowlands went to salt lake city for this a.m. original. >> reporter: in the back room of a salt lake city market, latino activist tony lapis has a hot
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line for people to call to find out if they are on the list. >> it has sent a chilling effect into our community. >> he's not on the list, okay? no. >> reporter: the list surfaced two weeks ago. two state employees now being terminated allegedly used medical data to come up with the personal information of 21300 reported immigrants. the list was sent to government agencies, law enforcement and the media with this letter demanding the people on this list be deported immediately. >> i got here illegally. but i didn't know i was doing anything wrong because i was young, but now i know that it is bad. >> reporter: we met 25-year-old jesus at a park. he didn't want us to show his home or use his last name. jesus is on the list. he's lived in utah illegally since he was 15 when he says his father brought him here from mexico. he has a wife, who is also here
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illegally, and a 2-year-old daughter who was born in utah. >> it is pretty sad and scary because if somebody comes to your door and knocks, hey, let's go. >> reporter: jesus says the tension he feels living in utah is growing, but the ongoing immigration debate and now the list. >> to think there's fear in the hearts of these illegal aliens, i celebrate that. >> reporter: eli cawley is pretty clear on where he stands. >> they swam here, they crawled here, by whatever way they got here, they can go back that way. >> reporter: kawley believes a lot of utah is on his side when it comes to illegal immigration. in an april poll, 65% of utah voters surveyed said they support an arizona 1070 type law here. one is in the works and is expected to pass next year. >> i'm tired of the lack of civility.
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i'm tired of the hatred. and i'm tired of the hostility. i think utahans or the majority of utahans are above that. >> reporter: gary herbert hosted a discussion on illegal immigration. there were disagreements on what the state should do about it, but all sides were quick to blame the federal goverment for not doing something years ago. >> in the absence of federal action on this, there could be no other alternative but for states like utah to move forward. >> reporter: as for the list, the attorney general announced a criminal investigation into the leak, although jesus admits he's in the country illegally, officials say some of the people on the list are here legally do you think you should be able to stay? >> yeah, i think i should have the chance to stay here. >> reporter: you can see jesus' name here on the list. he's hoping the federal government will pass immigration reform and have a path to citizenship for he and his wife. if it doesn't happen, he does have plans to move back to
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mexico. john, sarah? and with arizona's immigration law taking effect on thursday, cnn will be on the ground there tracking it all. we'll join our chief national corp upon correspondent john king hosting his show there live wednesday night at 7:00 p.m. only here on cnn. top stories are coming your way in two minutes' time. don't go away.
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good morning. it is monday, july 26th. i'm sarah sidener. >> good morning to you. i'm john king. >> we have a lot to talk about. >> it is ironic sarah came over to the united states from india to get away from the heat for a little r&r. >> that didn't work out too well. >> sorry about that. you are here during the hottest weather we have had in a couple years. good to have you here. >> thank you, john. a massive air and ground search is underway in afghanistan for two u.s. navy sailors who disappeared south of kabul. the u.s. military is offering
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reward money for information about their location. we are following this developing story from the pent gop. pentagon. bash rar barbara starr is on this story just ahead. and a whistle-blower website released this leak, and the white house condemns the leak. but it raises questions on whether pakistan has been aiding the enemy. and rob marciano is assessing the gulf from the air. and we are deep beneath the ocean to test the coral reef for signs of ocean distress. >> we are just being lowered into the water right now 88 miles off the coast of florida, and we are hoar with a group of scientists heading down to survey deep water reefs. >> roger that, we are diving. >> csi beneath the sea. that's straight ahead.
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and the a.m. fix flog is up and running. go to cnn.com/amfix. we begin with a massive military search now underway in afghanistan. troops are trying to find two u.s. sailors who went missing in a taliban stronghold south of kabul. there are reports the two were captured by i surry gents and one of them killed, but the u.s. will not confirm that. exactly what happened to the sailors remains a mystery. barbara starr is following live developments from the pentagon. what do we know at this point, barbara? >> reporter: very little. the big question is where are the two navy sailors, why did they leave the compound in kabul, a capital city there, on friday. in a single armored suv vehicle. not one of the armed convoys with multiple vehicles. they were by themselves in one single vehicle and drove south of the capital into logar province. still no idea of what they were
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doing there. we are not being told that. they apparently got into a firefight with some taliban who found out they were there. afghan officials say one man killed, one captured. the u.s. not confirming the fate of them, but they are missing. and this air and ground search is underway. every hour, very vital. there's a lot of concern about them possibly being moved across the border into pakistan. the only official statement at length we have is from the chief and navaled admiral. here's what he says, quote, the thoughts apes prayers of our entire navy go out to the mits missing sailors. their families have been notified and everyone is waiting to hear the outcome of this. >> do we know when we may learn
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the names of the two missing sailors? >> reporter: pardon me. the identities, certainly, are being very closely held at this point. their families have been notified, but the military says for now they are going to hold off on publicly naming them. they want to keep this search going and keep it going as forcefully as they can with this little publicity. >> barbara starr at the pentagon this morning with the latest. thank you. the white house is condemning the release of more than 90,000 classified documents on the war in afghanistan. the secret files were leaked online by the website wikileaks. the white house says the release puts u.s. troops and their partners on the ground at risk. the wikileaks fond founder defended his actions this morning. >> some of the information was inaccurate that would be leading to you are ill legit macy, quite
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correct. however, we have never released misdescribed material, and i don't expect this case to be an exception. >> cnn's tikas shebert is here with more. >> reporter: that's right. the press conference is still ongoing. this is the frontline club, a local press club here. you can see there's a lot of media attention here already. satellite trucks are setting up here taking this live. basically, julia says there are 90,000 u.s. military wreckers. excuse me, sir. sorry about that. >> i love england! >> reporter: many are coming forward to show the grim reality of the war on a day-by-day basis. here's what's in some of those
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reports. this is video that sealed wikileaks for having classified materials. it included the killings of two journalists in an attack by u.s. forces in iraq in 2007. now wikileaks is publishing what it says is more than 90,000 u.s. military reports filed about the war in afghanistan from 2004 to 2009. raw data from the frontline. a day-by-day unvarnished view of the world by u.s. soldiers themselves. wikileaks won't say how it received the documents and cnn has not been able to confirm their authenticity, but if confirmed it would be the biggest leak yet of classified documents to wikileaks. >> it is sort of the total squaller of the war, so all these people killed in the small events that we have not heard about, which numerically equips
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the big events, the casualty events, it is the boy killed by a shell that missed the target. >> reporter: in a statement responding to wikileaks afghan document release, the white house said, the united states strongly don condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of americans and our partners at risk, and thenen our national security. but the editor for wikileaks denies this has put troops in damg danger and says it held back sensitive material. >> there certainly have been people who lost elections as a result of material being put on wikileaks, and there are prosecutions taking place because of the material on wikileaks. what has not happened is anyone being physically harmed as a result. >> reporter: he says his aim is to shine some light on abuses in the field and give the general
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public the information it needs to have an informed opinion on the war. >> this material doesn't just reveal occasional abuses by the u.s. military. of course, the u.s. military is reporting on abuses by the taliban, suicide bombers, ieds going off and so on, so it does describe the abuses by both sides in this war. and that's how people can really understand what is actually going on, whether they choose to support it or not. >> reporter: now, the fact is there's such a massive amount of information inside all of this raw data that wikileaks says it has barely scratched the surface. this is a job not for just one single media, but it is for more than the media. it is really a public resource. wikileaks says for anyone who may be able to shed some slight on how the words are conducting in afghanistan, that is how wikileaks says they hope this
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will be used. >> atika, we should also talk to you about this because cnn is looking over the documents and pouring over them. we have a legal team, a standard practices team to really determine what the news value of this is, but also to look into really if it does endanger troops, american ornate toe allies in the field, how is that happening this morning? >> reporter: we do have several points, legal teams in addition to the fact that our pentagon reporters and the reporters in afghanistan are trying to get reaction that keeps streaming in. obviously, trying to figure out exactly what is in the reports, whether or not they could be potentially harmful to those in the field. this is something we take very seriously, and so that's why we are pouring through the records at this moment. we have not been able to independently verify the authenticity of these documents. we have been getting reaction from the white house as you saw
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from the ground in afghanistan, but in terms of what is exactly in the documents, whether or not they could be harmful, we don't know yet. there's too much information there, and we'll have to go through it with a fine tooth comb. >> we talked a lot about afghanistan, but there's also information about pakistan and its possible role in aiding possibly the taliban. can you tell us anything about that and what you are hearing from the editor of wikileaks. >> reporter: well, what's important to note is that these are really ports coming from soldiers in the field reporting back to the command center. so what they are doing is picking up intelligence on the ground. and what giuliana is saying is that a lot of these reports are showing reports on the ground where people on the ground are saying, the isi, the pakistan intelligence service, has been in connection with the taliban.
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they are working with the taliban. there are little reports here and there, but that doesn't mean there's any definitive proof, but it does show that's the chatter that these field reports are capturing. and this is what is the big concern for the isi and the white house. >> okay, atika, it can be damaging to several parties. we'll have our teams look into this information that's been put out by wikileaks. the u.s. and south korea are flexing military muscle trying to send a message to the north. two countries are conducting joint military exercises off the korean peninsula involving 20 ships and sub marines and some 200 aircraft. the drills are in response to north korea's sinking of a south korean warship back in march. pyong yang is threatening to retaliate with say red war. reports this morning that tony hayward won't survive a board meeting today in london. bob dudley, the company's highest ranking american executive and the man in charge of the day-to-day cleanup effort, is expected to take
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over. well, efforts to plug the leaking oil well, are they back on track? rob marciano is up live coming up next. it is 12 minutes after the hour. to america's debt e and to the chinese government that lends us money. and to the interest for which we pay, compoundable with higher taxes and lower pay until the day we die.
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that will wake you up. welcome back to the most news in the morning. work is resuming in the gulf of mexico on the two critical relief wells. and cleanup crews are back in the water as well. but they are not finding much oil oddly enough to clean up. >> it seems the tropical storm bonnie created some churn moving a lot of oil to the north, and the storm operations delayed killing the well up to a week. rob marciano is live in gulf port, mississippi, this morning. getting back on track, they are looking to attempt a static kill. what's the timetable for that? >> reporter: well, so everything we talked about before bonnie is still what we are talking about now, but obviously the delay. the drilling rig that they are using to drill the relief well, when they start to move that thing, it only moves three or four knots. it crawls across the ocean. any time you get it out of place, getting it back in is a process.
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they have lowered the apparatus, the cap there for the relief well. they have to unplug the hole and then start to lay this casing and cement the casing. that process takes five to seven days. until that's done, they can't start that static kill. so we are looking at the week of august 1st, or basically next monday, a week from today and beyond is when they would try the static kill. in the benefit of that, i am told, is it will speed up the bottom kill, that will completely end this thing, which is still sometime in mid-august, but it is potentially seven days after or to the right like the admiral says from their original date. bonnie could have delays things further and pushed more oil onshore than it did. >> thank you, rob. we have to show you this video caught on tape. you see these every now and
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then, but this is just amazing video. there you see a plane, a fighter plane, practicing. and see right there, that is the pilot ejecting right before that plane smashes into the ground and explodes. what video. good luck for the pilot who got out of there, but man, a fireball. >> pretty incredible. he got out just in time. and attention deficit disorder, is it taking a toll on marmgs across the country? and if it is, what the heck do you do about it? we'll talk to an expert who has written a book about it from personal experience. it is 17 minutes after the hour. man, this is perfect. great. well, with every laptop, you get a geek. so, take your pick. [ mom ] look at all these fabulous geeks! there are so many! ♪ look at this one! it helps you video chat with mom! ♪ bingo! look at this one. you can video chat with me, honey. mom, go get the car!
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. it is 20 minutes after the hour now. it is time to mind your business for you, the white house is out in full force defending the administration's push to let the bush tax cuts for wealthy americans expire this year. treasury secretary timothy geithner said eliminating the tax breaks would alleviate the national deficit without hindering economic growth. >> we have also been seen as responsible to let the tax benefits expire to the wealthier americans we need to be able to show the world that we are ruling as a country now to bring progress to bring down our long-term deficits. >> there are other financial experts, alan greenspan, among them, say you can't cut the deficit and just tax the wealthy.
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if you want to trim the deficit, you have to have a combination of tax increases across the board as well as a cut in spending as well. the tax cuts, by the way, said to expire at midnight, december 31st. the sigh sci-fi thriller "inception" keeps the number one spot. this is a warner brothers film owned by cnn's parent company time warner. >> but it doesn't mean there's going to be a little something extra in your pact at the end of the year. new jersey's governor is going on record to defend his reputation. chris christie told jake tapper that he wanted them to know the new jersey shore is not like the one on the mtv reality show.
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>> it takes a bunch of new yorkers and drops them by the jersey shore. i can tell people, they want to know what new jersey is, i welcome them to come to new jersey any time. the jersey horse shore is a beautiful place. >> reporter: governor christie went on the to remind everyone there's still six weeks of summer left, and new jersey's beaches are waiting. >> did i hear him slack new yorkers there? he said there's a bunch of new yorkers there -- oh, am i stirring something up? >> he stirred it up. you are pointing it out. remember what was the movie, "miscongeniality." she said, why do they call new jersey the garden state? i used to live in new jersey and had a great time living in new jersey. our executive producer who also lives in new jersey is in my ear saying, watch it, or we are
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meeting in your office after the show. when it comes to close calls, it doesn't get closer than this. look at the incredible air show here in alberta, canada. there you see the captain of the cf-18 hornet ejecting and then the plane just smashes and blows up. his fighter jet crashing and bursting into flames there. obviously, he was okay. amazing. >> he is reportedly in stable condition at a local hospital. obviously, there are effects when you punch out like that. and he punched out sideways as well. he's expected to be just fine. you can see the parachute open and he managed to land all right. no word yet on what went wrong where the jet. >> well, coming up, most researchers are studying the oil slick from the top of the water looking down to find where the oil has gone. amber goes on a dive to look for damage under the water. we have that coming up. it is 23 minutes after the hour. hey, smart, we could stay here foence.
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arizona's controversial immigration law set to take effect on thursday, but just over the state's northern border, one utah lawmaker pushing ahead with a similar bill for his state. and two utah state employees were just fired for now an infamous immigration list. >> it had names and information on 1300 utah residents in the country illegally. the debate is starting to divide the state, and that's why ted
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roland went to salt lake city for the a.m. original. >> reporter: in the back room of the salt lake city market, tony llapias has a hotline to find out if people are on the list. >> it is showing a fact to our community. >> he's not on the list, okay? no. >> reporter: the list surfaced two weeks ago. two state employees who are now being terminated allegedly used medical data to come up with the personal information of 1300 reported illegal immigrants. the list was sent to government agencies, law enforcement and the media with the letter demanding that the people on the list be deported immediately. >> i got here illegally. by that i didn't know that i was doing any bad because i was young, but now i know that it is a bad thing. >> reporter: we met 25-year-old jesus at a park. he didn't want us to show his home or use his last name.
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jesus is on the list. he says he's lived in utah illegally since he was 15 when his father brought him here from mexico. he has a wife, who is also here illegally, and a 2-year-old daughter who was born in utah. >> it is pretty sad and scary because what if somebody comes to your door and knocks, hey, let's go. >> reporter: jesus says the tension he feels in utah is growing with the ongoing immigration debate and now the list. >> to think there's fear in the hearts of the illegal ail yeps, i celebrate that. >> reporter: eli cawley is clear on where he stands. >> they swam here, they walked here, they crawled here. by whatever way they got here, they can go back that way. >> reporter: he says people call him a big got, but he believes utah is on his side when it comes to the illegal immigration. in an april poll, 65% of voters
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surveyed said they support an arizona 1070-type law here. one is in the works and is expected to pass next year. >> i'm tired of the lack of severity, i'm tired of the hatred and the hostility. i think utahans or the majority of utahans are above that. >> reporter: last week gary herbert hosted a discussion on illegal immigration. while there were disagreements on what, if the state should do something about it. the federal government is being blamed for something years ago. in the abs sense of a federal obligation, for seats like utah to move forward -- >> the criminal investigation concluded into the week, but he's in the country illegally. some of the people here on the list are here illegally. do you think you should be able to stay? >> yeah, i think i should have the chance to say or stay here.
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>> reporter: he is hoping they will pass immigration reform and give him a path to citizenship for he and his wife. he says if it doesn't happen, he has plans to move back to mexico. >> thank you, ted rowlands there for us. with arizona's immigration law taking effect on thursday, cnn will be there on the ground tracking it all. join our chief national correspondent john king. we are going to be broadcasting this show live from arizona starting on wednesday night. that's johnson, 7:00 p.m. eastern, only on 79. it is time for this morning's top stories. a massive military search continues in afghanistan for two u.s. sailors who disappeared at a taliban stronghold. a 20,000 reward is being offered for any information. there is a report that one of the sailors was killed by insurgents and the other is taken captive. u.s. troops are not confirming that at this time.
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wikileaks is a whistle-blower website that published more than 90,000 pages of military reports on the wall. the founder says they are doing a public service. >> when we publish material, what we say is the document as we describe it is true. we publish cna reports all thement time. and a legitimate cia report, that doesn't mean the cia is telling the truth. and bp's ceo tony hayward, well, he may not make it through the day with his job today. several reports are that he could be out as soon as today. yeah, this point as of right now
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he is. many are trying to determine whether the oil spill has had a gulf on the oil sensitive reefs. >> amber, you didn't just look on the top of the water, you got down in a submarine and looked underneath. what are you seeing? any damage? >> reporter: well, sarah, as of now we went to visit the reef. there's no visible damage, but they are still waiting on test results. we did get a unique look here. we went down in a mini submarine out of a science-fiction movie. the dispersed oil underneath the well are like the blood pressure of the ocean. for this urgent mission, scientists say the relief range all the way to investigators.
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>> roger that. okay, you guys need to stay back. >> we are just being lowered into the water right now about 88 miles off the coast of florida. we are here with a group of scientists from florida atlantic university. we are heading down to survey deep water reefs. >> mission to dive. >> rommer roger that. we are diving. >> all right. we are heading down. >> as we are gliding along here, it almost looks like you are swimming through the water, but we have 5 1/4 inches of plexcy glass holding us in. >> the depth is 140 feet. >> i think people tend to think that the deeper you go, the deeper wells, there's nothing living down there. look around you, amber, there's a lot living down there. >> there's a school of fish swimming along the side of us. >> reporter: the reefs are known
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as the wake forest reef. pomponi says this reef gets a clean bill of health for now, but it is still a rush to collect as many samples as possible for a baseline. so you guys are kind of the crime scene? >> yes. we are going to collect a sample of red value gee. >> we are using the end of a vacuum cleaner to suck up some algae. back on the research vessel, water samples are collected and analyzed for oxygen levels or any evidence of oil or dispersan dispersants. just released, epa and no
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samples shows decrease d bactera in the water. so is some oxygen, and the scientists are studying the reef. >> it is harmful for marine animals and fish because they need oxygen to live. so that's why -- >> it would be similar to not having a lot of oxygen in the air we breathe above water. >> right. >> reporter: so we are kind of in a crime scene. they are extracting tissue for dna samples. but instead of using humans, they are using sponge tissue. we are collecting information from it. this is where we are storing the samples. >> reporter: pamponi has been studying speeches like these for
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two years or more. >> there are no guarantees we'll be able to recorp store it. >> reporter: meanwhile, we hope to shed light and tension into the gulf deep waters. amber mullen in the gulf of mexico. and the scientists say it could take several months to get the results of the test back. they also say if the coral reed needs some help, when they return in years from now, then they hope to bring their before and after picture. >> researchers at fau first discovered evidence of massive plumes of oil under the water. is there any more information about those? are they still out there?
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>> reporter: as of now, like we said in the piece, the epa and noaa just came out with a research study showing they are monitoring levels. that came out on friday the day we took off saying the oxygen plumes are creating not as much oxygen, john. >> thank you, amber. bp is facing allegations of mishandled maintenance and structural problems with the pipelines. problematic pipeline only on cnn. attention deficit disorders can take a toll on your may remember, so what to do if your spouse is not listening. it is coming up on 8:40.
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a marriage is a partnership, but what happens when one of the partners suffers from adhd and the responsibilities begin to pile up on one side of the
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relationship? even though 15% of adult americans could have some form of adhd, very few couples realize the impact on the relationship. even if they do, they have no idea what to do about it. melissa orr is here with her book "the adhd effect on marriage." welcome, good to have you this morning. >> thank you. >> refresh us, what is adhd. and on a general level, how many people does it affect? >> it depends in terms of whether you are doing the symptoms very closely or more broadly, but somewhere between 5% and 16% of the population would have adhd. it is simply put a chemistry issue in the brain. there's not enough dopamine in the brain that has an effect on your ability to organize, plan, et cetera. >> you have personal experience with this base your marriage was fairly significantly impacted by adhd. what are the signs that adhd is
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beginning to take a toll on your marriage? >> well, my marriage was completely disfunctional, to be honest with you. >> true confession this is morning. >> a true confession. the signs include things such as a very distinct disorganization in the marriage, so you have a lot of responsibility and the non-adhd partner does 90% of the things around the house. you would have sometimes parent/child interactions where the non-ad partner is constantly reminding, et cetera, and the add partner is a child. off lot of chronic nagging. it is not nagging once in a while, it is nagging all the time. the only way you can get it done is if it becomes verbal and difficult. a good sign is if you have a child diagnosed with adhd, it is
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highly irritable. >> as we said, true cop if he thinkses here. what was going on? -- you have patterns that happen when you have an adhd symptom, then a response to the system and a response to the response. distractability, for example, around household chores could mean things don't get done by the add partner. you start to determine that as your partner doesn't care. so when you start to think your partner doesn't care, there's resentment and anger and that shows up and goes back to the partner. then it becomes very messy. >> so what do you do about it? how do you take a disfunctional relationship because of adhd and turn it into a functional relationship? >> i have done that. we have a fabulous marriage now. we have completely turned it around. you have to understand you have the adhd. get a full evaluation, because
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there may be something else as well. >> what does that entail? >> well, you would go to a psychiatrist or doctor and they would do a whole history of questions and ask you about the various symptoms and try to determine if you've had them your whole life. >> so there's identifying the problem. what else? >> and then there's also, i think it is very important in a as well as ship, relationship, identifying how much the symptoms impact the non-add partner, so you really get reason to change things. an a.d.d. person has been living with this their entire lives. the non-a.d.d. partner has not. >> realize the problem, realize what you are doing, but what do you do about it in terms of behaviorally or physically? >> three things you want to do. a three-legged stool, you need all three. one is make physiological changes, so you address the dopamine and chemical issue in your brain. you can do that in a number of ways. one is with medication. >> so you can take a stimulant or an anti-depressant.
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>> you can also use rubbermaid exercise. >> we were mentioning that off camera, the fish oil is the stuff that you get. the fish oil capsules that you burp and taste like you ate a salmon. >> you don't have to burp, but it will improve focus. it affects dopamine levels, so that's why. the second leg is behavioral changes. once you can focus better and are a little less disorganized in your brain, you can change the cope iing measure. learn not to walk away from difficult conversations, things like that. >> how long does all of this take? >> depends on the couple. we had to experiment a lot. there was no real guide for us. that's why i wrote this book, in fact, was to be able to help people move through it faster that my husband and i did. i have seen everything from a
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couple months to a year or something, a couple years where you really get things reorganized. >> but a new particular case, at least. >> well worth it. >> were you about on the out there is? >> yes, we told our children we were getting a divorce. >> wow. where did the light go on? >> well, it is a matter of not only understanding a.d.d. but understanding both partners contribute to this. it is a response thing that just goes on, and it took me a while to realize something was wrong. >> food for you on the marriage. way to go on not breaking up. great to talk to you. >> thank you. no matter where you were in the u.s. this weekend, you probably had some nasty weather. it was scorching hot or stormy. what's in store for the week? jacqui jeras is with us next.
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sounds terrific. cars built for the autobahn. actually, we're both pretty conservative drivers. ooh! shoot the gap. shoot the gap! whoo! so, they all come with carefree maintenance? yep, scheduled maintenance is included. i like the color. good. [ male announcer ] the autobahn for all event. lease the jetta limited edition for $199 a month or get 0% apr. ♪
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♪ kid rock there. "all summer long." you are looking at miami, florida. former hometown, hi, miami. partly cloudy, 87 degrees. thunderstorms are expected. what can you do? >> it is a typical summer day in miami, right? and not just a rocker, a kid rocker. >> that was the song of the summer two years ago. still love it, though. we'll toss it to jacqui jeras in the extreme weather center. it has been extreme. >> who is not complaining about the weather these days, right? i can't tell you how many facebook postings i have seen, can you get rid of the storms, it is hot. can you get rid of the heat? i'm happy to say we are helping you out across the midwest and the northeast where things have been dramatically improving. but unfortunately, across the south, things are not getting better. the frontal system has moved and it is helping things the north, but it will trigger thunderstorms. we still have high pressure in the upper levels here, and that will trap the moisture into
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place, which means it is going to be really humid for a whole lot of folks the next couple of days as well. there you can see the radar picture. we have a lot of showers and thundershowers coming in with the onshore flow across the gulf of mexico, so all the gulf coast states will see pop-up showers and storms on occasion throughout the day. we do believe they will become more widespread near the tennessee river valley later today. delays because of that. expect them in atlanta and the northeast as well. and the heat will persist in the southeast where we have a lot of advisories still ongoing. 100 to 110 can be expected after a weekend of record highs. john and sarah, back to you. >> yeah, but it is a dry heat, right? >> not so much. >> it doesn't matter. it is so hot. and rock bands deal with exhausting schedules, cramped tour buses and bad catering, but the kings of leon draw the line at pigeon droppings. they were forced to walk off the stage friday night because of a
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pigeon infestation above the stage. you can imagine what was happening to them. they really tried to hang in there, but the aerial attack was just ridiculous. live nation is offering them a full refund. >> who knows what's going to happen there. lance armstrong says good-bye to the tour de france. he's hanging it up after his final, final race after winning it seven times. he finished 23rd in the race, not as well as he hoped to do, but what a career. 52 minutes after the hour. at ally bank, our raise your rate cd gives you a great rate... ... and the opportunity to raise it to an even better rate... ... one time over the course of your term. try us at allybank.com. dge allegiance to america's debt and to the chinese government that lends us money. and to the interest for which we pay, compoundable with higher taxes
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and lower pay until the day we die. american taxpayers owe more than $500 hundred million in interest payments every day to cover our government's debt. much of that debt is owed to foreign governments. go to defeatthedebt.com. debt stinks!
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♪ hard working crew there in the control room. for the third time in four years, spain's contador wins the tour de france. yesterday's final route was delayed when the teams had to put their other jersey back on. lance armstrong was trying to promote his cancer charity. and cooperstown has new induck tees. andre dawson and whiteyherzog were the newest induck tees. dawson played for the chicago cubs. herzog managed the cardinals to a world series crown in 1982. five minutes until the top of the hour. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] at aarp we believe you're never done growing.
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i want to take him on his first flight. [ female announcer ] discover the best of what's next at aarp.org.
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here's a question for you. is your boss a jerk? and is that illegal? new york state may become the first in the nation to outlaw workplace bullying. >> the state senate has passed a bill that would allow workers to sue their bosses for medical expenses and lost wages for emotional stress. 16 other states are considering a similar workplace bullying legislation. we asked lawyer and thyme.contributor earlier about it on "american morning." why is this law important now? >> well, people have been working on this for a while. new york city has this at a big victory, but some places are becoming more of a jungle. there's the sense that bosses are getting away with a lot more than they used to. >> critics of the workplace bullying lawsuit say the cases could be very hard to prove and lead to more frivolous lawsuits. >> of course, anybody who is watching "madmen" knows they can get aay

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American Morning
CNN July 26, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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